Most Shared

Weather Alert

TRAVEL-DISRUPTING SNOW POSSIBLE WEDNESDAY

A coastal storm will ride to our east, throwing moisture into building cold air overhead Wednesday. This means rain and snow mix developing for the entire area Tuesday night and for a very busy travel day on Wednesday. By the time it tapers late Wednesday, we could see up to three inches of snow here in the city, and maybe even up to four inches or so in places like Carroll County.

WEATHER ALERT




Weather Alert Radar

Syria Coverage

Syria Coverage

 
text size

Obama: Syrian Chemical Weapon Ban Must be Enforced

Updated: Tuesday, September 24 2013, 12:45 PM EDT

UNITED NATIONS (AP) - President Barack Obama said Tuesday the U.N. Security Council must agree to a resolution on Syrian chemical weapons that includes consequences for President Bashar Assad if he doesn't meet demands to dismantle his stockpile.

Obama challenged the U.N. to include such accountability in any resolution, saying the international body's reputation is at stake.

"If we cannot agree even on this," he said, "then it will show that the United Nations is incapable of enforcing the most basic of international laws."

The United States and Russia have brokered an agreement for Syria to give up its chemical weapons. But the countries are at odds on what the possible consequences would be if Syria doesn't comply.

"We believe that as a starting point the international community must enforce the ban in international weapons," he said in his address to the U.N. General Assembly.

The agreement between Washington and Moscow came as Obama was pushing Congress to approve a military strike against Syria for a chemical weapons attack last month on civilians outside Damascus that the Obama administration says was carried out by Assad's regime. The subsequent diplomatic steps agreed to by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov placed the threat of force on hold.

Still, The Russians have challenged the administration's claims of Assad culpability and Assad has blamed rebel forces for the attack.

Obama aggressively pushed back against those claims in his speech Tuesday.

"It's an insult to human reason and to the legitimacy of this institution to suggest that anyone other than the regime carried out this attack," the president said.

Obama also said that while the international community has recognized the stakes involved in the more than 2-year-old civil war, "our response has not matched the scale of the challenge."

Obama announced that the United States will provide $339 million in additional humanitarian aid to refugees and countries affected by the Syrian civil war, bringing the total American aid devoted to that crisis to nearly $1.4 billion. The White House said the aid will include $161 million spent inside Syria for medical care, shelter and sanitation projects, with the remainder going to help Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Turkey and Egypt.

Obama reiterated his demand that Assad cannot continue to lead Syria, but said he would not use U.S. military force to depose him.

"That is for the Syrian people to decide," he said. "Nevertheless, a leader who slaughtered his citizens and gassed children to death cannot regain the legitimacy to lead a badly fractured country."

He called on Assad allies to stop supporting his regime.

"The notion that Syria can somehow return to a pre-war status quo is a fantasy," he said. "It's time for Russia and Iran to realize that insisting on Assad's role will lead directly to the outcome that they fear: an increasingly violent space for extremists to operate."

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Obama: Syrian Chemical Weapon Ban Must be Enforced


Advertise with us!

Related Stories


The Syrian civil war, (also known as the Syrian uprising or Syrian crisis) is an ongoing armed conflict in Syria between forces loyal to the Ba'ath government and those seeking to oust it. A part of the larger Middle Eastern protest movement known as the Arab Spring, the conflict began March 15th, 2011 with local demonstrations that grew in scope to become nationwide by April 2011.

Protesters demanded the resignation of President Bashar al-Assad, whose family has held the presidency in Syria since 1971, as well as the end of Ba'ath Party rule, which began in 1963.

The Syrian Army was deployed in April of 2011 to stop the uprising, and soldiers fired on demonstrators across the country. After months of cities and neighborhoods being cut-off by the Army the protests evolved into an armed rebellion.

The Arab League, United States, European Union, and other countries condemned the use of violence against the protesters. The Arab League suspended Syria's membership as a result of the government's response to the crisis, but granted the Syrian National Coalition, a coalition of Syrian political opposition groups, Syria's seat on 6 March 2013.

According to the UN, about 4 million Syrians have been displaced within the country and 2 million have fled to other countries.

Syrian government supporters include Russia and Iran, while Qatar and Saudi Arabia are providing material and weapons to the rebels.


 
Watch live streaming video from syrianfreedom at livestream.com

Syria National Videos

Poll

Do you feel that the U. S. should launch a military attack against Syria?

Yes
No
Not Sure

Poll Results

50% Yes
50% No

Advertise with us!