Baltimore Orioles Legend Frank Robinson dies at age 83


    FILE - This July 25, 2010, file photo shows Hall of Famer Frank Robinson during Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

    LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, the first black manager in Major League Baseball and the only player to win the MVP award in both leagues, has died. He was 83.

    Robinson had been in hospice care at his home in Bel Air. MLB confirmed his death Thursday.

    Robinson hit 586 career home runs and won the Triple Crown while leading the Baltimore Orioles to their first World Series championship in 1966.

    An All-Star outfielder in 12 seasons, his legacy extended far beyond the batter's box.

    Robinson fulfilled his quest to become the first African-American manager in the big leagues when the Cleveland Indians hired him in 1975. In his first at-bat as their player-manager, he hit a home run.


    The Angelos Family issued a statement on the passing of the Orioles Legend: “Frank Robinson was not only one of the greatest players in Orioles history, but was also one of the premier players in the history of baseball. Fans will forever remember Frank for his 1966 season in which he won the Triple Crown and was named MVP during a year that brought Baltimore its first World Series championship. His World Series MVP performance capped off one of the greatest individual seasons in baseball history. An Orioles Legend and a Baseball Hall of Famer, Frank brought us so many wonderful memories, including two championships, during his time in Baltimore.

    “As the first African-American manager in Major League history, Frank was a proponent of civil rights causes on and off the field, including policies that paved the way for minorities to have increased access to executive and management positions in baseball. His leadership in the front office and as manager of the Orioles was highlighted by being named the American League Manager of the Year in 1989. To this day, Frank remains the only person in Orioles history to serve as a player, coach, manager, and front office executive.

    “Frank’s contributions to the Orioles and his work as an ambassador for Major League Baseball will never be forgotten. This is a difficult day for our entire organization and for our many fans. We extend our condolences to his wife, Barbara, his daughter, Nichelle, his entire family, and his many friends across our game.”

    Robinson also managed San Francisco, Baltimore and Montreal. He became the first manager of the Washington Nationals after the franchise moved from Montreal for the 2005 season.

    Later, Robinson spent several years working as an executive for MLB.

    Robinson was the NL MVP with Cincinnati in 1961 and Baltimore in 1966. The Reds, Orioles and Indians have retired Robinson's No. 20 and saluted him with statues at their ballparks. He's also in the Nationals' Ring of Honor.



    News In Photos

      Loading ...